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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 | History

3 edition of Gender differences in mental health outcomes of spouses of persons with dementia found in the catalog.

Gender differences in mental health outcomes of spouses of persons with dementia

Regina S. Boarman

Gender differences in mental health outcomes of spouses of persons with dementia

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  • 13 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Regina S. Boarman.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofilm 92/550 (R)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationviii, 158 leaves.
Number of Pages158
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1388161M
LC Control Number92955291

People with dementia typically require more supervision, are less likely to express gratitude for the help they receive, and are more likely to be depressed. All of these factors have been linked to negative caregiver outcomes. 7, Mental health. Mental Health Needs of Family Caregivers: Identifying, Engaging and Assisting Sponsored By: U.S. Administration on Aging & American Psychological Association Septem U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, ADMINISTRATION ON AGING, WASHINGTON DC PHONE | FAX | EMAIL .


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Gender differences in mental health outcomes of spouses of persons with dementia by Regina S. Boarman Download PDF EPUB FB2

There were no differences in depression, satisfaction with life, or loneliness according to caregivers' gender. Male caregivers had more comorbidities than females (CCI versusPwives of male caregivers had a more severe stage of dementia than husbands of female caregivers (CDR, P= ; MMSE versusPCited by: Most caregivers for people with dementia are spouses, and women outnumber men.

Due to an aging population, and women’s higher risk of dementia as well as men’s increased life expectancy, the number. Dementia in men versus women.

Dementia is one of the most common diseases related to aging, and its impact on society is growing with time because of the rapid aging of populations worldwide [11, 12].It remains unclear whether women have a higher risk than men to develop dementia or AD at a given age [12, 13].Several European studies have suggested that Cited by:   Although studies report conflicting findings, research has shown that the loss of mental health and wellbeing associated with having a spouse with dementia increases with age [10, 29], female sex [10, 34, 35], and low income [29, 35, 36].Cited by: Although the causes of gender differences remain poorly understood, awareness of these differences may help identify persons at risk for dementia, affect its prognosis, and have implications for.

The proportion of male caregivers is rapidly increasing. However, there are few large scale studies exploring gender differences in the burden or coping with caregiving. We investigated this among caregivers of patients with dementia. The study cohort consisted of dyads of wife-husband couples from two studies including dementia patients and their spousal by:   Core tip: Women form the bulk of those who provide care for people with mental illnesses.

Many studies have found that they are more exposed to caregiving stressors and report greater strain, burden and distress than men. However, the evidence for such gender differences in caregiving is equivocal and inconsistent leading to the view that caregiver-gender Cited by: Gender disparities in mental health pdf, kb; Women's mental health: The Facts.

Depressive disorders account for close to % of the disability from neuropsychiatric disorders among women compared to % among men.

Leading mental health problems of the older adults are depression, organic brain syndromes and dementias. A majority are women. The typical profile of a dementia caregiver is a middle-aged or older female child or spouse of the person with dementia. 3, In the US, at least 60% of unpaid caregivers are wives, daughters, daughters-in-law, granddaughters, and other female relatives, 3,11 although male caregivers are becoming more frequent.

In men made up 40% of Cited by:   Mental health in the context of primary care Mental health is vital to positive physical outcomes and, as for all patients, should be addressed for transgender patients in primary care. Due to pathologization and mistreatment by mental health professionals, transgender people are often reluctant to engage with mental health providers.[1,2] Primary.

recipients, reports on the sex and gender differences that may be present among family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD) are lacking. Attention to and a synthesis of these sex and gender distinctions have direct implications on the planning and development of health services for this population.

The current protocol outlines a strategyCited by: 1. Introduction While much is known about caregiving burden and its consequences on both caregivers and care recipients, reports on the sex and gender differences that may be present among family caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD) are lacking.

Attention to and a synthesis of these sex and gender distinctions have direct implications on the planning and development of health Cited by: 1.

Women, spouses, and those in lower socioeconomic groups appear more vulnerable. 7 Compared to noncaregivers, dementia caregivers report higher levels of stress, more depression and anxiety symptoms, and lower levels of subjective well-being, self-efficacy, 8 and anxiety.

9 In addition, they experience worse physical health outcomes, including higher levels of stress hormones, compromised immune response, antibodies, greater medication Cited by: Mental Health in Rural Caregivers of Persons With Dementia.

Coping and health outcomes in spouse. caregivers of persons with dementia. Gender differences with respect to the. Relationships between gender, age, family conditions, physical and mental health, and social isolation of elderly caregivers - Volume 24 Issue 3 - Anita Liberalesso Neri, Mônica Sanches Yassuda, Andréa Cristina Garofe Fortes-Burgos, Efigênia Passarelli Mantovani, Flávia Silva Arbex, Stella Vidal de Souza Torres, Mônica Rodrigues Perracini, Maria Elena Cited by:   Caregivers’ relationship closeness with the person with dementia predicts both postive and negative outcomes for caregivers’ physical health and psychological well-being.

Aging and Mential Health, 16, – doi: /Cited by: Measures. CI was determined by the 30‐item Chinese Mini‐Mental State Examination (C‐MMSE), based on the MMSE, which is a widely used assessment of overall cognitive status in epidemiological studies. 24 As suggested in the literature, the optimal cutoff scores for dementia screening vary by education levels in Chinese older populations, with 16 to 17 for the illiterate.

Cited by: 2. Loneliness and the risk of dementia among older Chinese adults: gender differences Article in Aging and Mental Health 22(3) January with 53 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

The most common disorder in caregiving studies is dementia (Murrel & Meeks, ), and those that have focused on gender differences are also disproportionately based on dementia caregiving samples (Yee and Schulz ).

It may be that giving care to someone who is losing his or her mental capacities is especially burdensome for wife by:   In this study, we investigated the role that caregiver mental health plays in patient mortality.

In patient–caregiver dyads, we found that worse caregiver mental health predicted greater patient mortality even when accounting for key risk factors in patients (i.e., diagnosis, age, sex, dementia severity, and patient mental health). Thus, although providing the best Cited by: Download Citation | Social Support for Spouse Caregivers of Persons With Dementia | This study analyzes the value of simultaneously taking helper and caregiver characteristics into account when.

Finding meaning as a mediator of burden on the health of caregivers of spouses with dementia. Aging & Mental Health, Vol. 15, Issue. 4, p.

Intentions to care for a spouse: gender differences in anticipated willingness to care The existential life situations of spouses of persons with dementia before and after relocating to a Cited by:   Stress-and-coping models of caregiving suggest that gender differences in caregiver health can be explained by gender differences in caregiver stressors and resources (e.g., Lutzky & Knight, ; Pearlin et al., ).

Thus, we expected with regard to our fourth research question that gender differences in caregivers' mental and physical Cited by: Fifty-two male spouse caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease and 53 demographically equated controls completed multidimensional assessments of mental and physical health.

Results indicate that compared with noncaregiving men, male spouse caregivers have poorer mental and physical health, but only within limited domains of health by: from experiencing poor mental health as a consequence of caregiving. • Spouses/Partners may invest considerable energy in providing care, and may do so to the detriment of their own wellbeing.

• There are gender differences in caregiving in this context, which will influence the type of coping strategies used and the support that they. GENDER MEDICINE/VoL. 4, No.

2, Gender Differences in Dementia Risk Factors Nahid A. Azad, MD, FRCP(C)I-3; Muneerah AI Bugami, MD4; and Inge Loy-English, MD, FRCP(C)5 1Geriatric Assessment Inpatient Unit, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 2University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa, Ontario; 4Women's Health Cited by: BEYOND GENDER STEREOTYPES: Spouse Caregivers of Persons With Dementia BAILA MILLER* Case Western Reserve University JULIE E.

KAUFMAN University of Illinois-Chicago ABSTRACT: This study used data from spouse caregivers of persons with dementia to examine if gender was a salient dimension in the ways that African-Amer- ican and white Cited by:   Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible, degenerative, fatal disease and is the most common form of dementia among older people.

Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person’s ability to carry out daily activities. It usually begins after age 60 and the risk goes up as you get older.

Risk is also higher if a family member has the. She co-authored the fifth edition of Women and Gender, a textbook released in November that explores women’s relationships, physical and mental health, and violence against women, among other areas. The book addresses the social construction of gender and explores ways to effect change, including through political advocacy.

The number of people living with dementia worldwide is currently estimated at 47 million, with this figure expected to rise to more than million by (Prince, Matthew, & Prina, ).The vast majority of people with dementia are cared for at home by their spouse (DeVugt et al., ) meaning that the number of spouses caring for them is also rapidly Cited by: 1.

Analyses of Mental and Physical Health Effects Meta-analyses of the physical and mental health effects of caregiving have shown higher levels of depression and physical health problems in caregivers when compared with noncaregivers (Pinquart & Sorensen, ; Vitaliano, Zhang & Scanlon, ).

Family caregivers of people with dementia are more likely to develop mental health problems such as major depression and anxiety disorders. Female caregivers report overall higher levels of burden, stress and depressive symptoms than male caregivers, with similar outcomes being reported across different countries and settings.

Caregivers of people. Whether personality plays a role in bolstering social support has important implications for understanding how spouses of dementia patients deal with the daily strains of caregiving and for reducing negative health outcomes for these caregivers. Literature Review. Social Support.

Publisher Summary. This chapter reviews the culture and mental health in later life of a human being. The chapter presents some conceptions of culture that take into account its functions vis-a-vis the social collectivity and its functions vis-a-vis individual personality. It also focuses on two related phenomena: (1) the special role that older individuals play in maintaining the ritual.

Structural equation modeling was used to test a model predicting health behavior change from personal and environmental characteristics, perceived stress, social support, and depressive symptoms in a sample of spouse caregivers of dementia patients and to examine gender differences in these by: Dementia is a decline in mental ability which affects memory, thinking, problem-solving, concentration and perception.

Dementia occurs as a result of the death of brain cells or damage in parts of the brain that deal with our thought processes. Some forms of dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease, are degenerative.

That is, they get worse over time. Gender identity and caregiver health related quality of life. Studying gender roles in relation to caregiving and HRQL is important as both women and men spouses have been found to cross gender role boundaries when providing care for their partners by doing tasks originally undertaken by their spouses [28–30].

Background and Purpose of Study: Research on the negative effects of dementia caregiving comparing family caregivers (CG) with non-caregivers (NCG) was recently summarized in a meta-analysis of 84 studies (Pinquart & Sorenson, ) Mental health outcomes showed the largest between-groups differences.

Research findings increasingly document that education, information, and psychosocial programs and support can contribute to the quality of life of both care partners, improve mental health outcomes for caregivers, and delay relocation to long-term care settings for individuals with dementia (see review by Smits et al., ).Cited by:   marriage and health are synergistic in human life.

it is true that marriage people are more healthy and stable mind than a single. It is my observation that early age marriages have good effect on humans in respect of long live, less diseased, and useful citizen in the society.

this survey has emerge good results and i agree with the results. It is a highly charged emotional event for the spouse that results in a loss of independence for the person with dementia.

For an interesting commentary on this issue see “More Mad and More Wise” (O’Neill, ).gender, and economic strain) have been correlated with negative caregiver outcomes (Bookwala & Schulz, ; Moritz et al., ; Whitlatch, Schur, Noelker, Ejaz, & Looman, ).

Dementia caregivers are negatively affected by “em-ployment complications, caregiver strain, mental and physi-cal health problems, time for leisure and other family.Dementia also has a greater impact on women as the majority of carers are women.

60 % of carers for people with dementia are women. Image Embed Share Info. Source: Women and Dementia: A Marginalised Majority by Alzheimer’s Research UK.

Women are times more likely to provide care for someone with dementia for over 5 years.